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Histograms

Histograms

Definition

The graphical equivalent of a grouped frequency table is the histogram, which is suitable for quantitative variables. The continuous variables are set out along the X and Y axis, and the width of the bars varies based on the class intervals.


Full text

The graphical equivalent of a grouped frequency table is the histogram, which is suitable for quantitative variables. It works the same way as a bar chart, with one fundamental difference. In a bar chart each bar has a fixed width which has no meaning; only the height of the bar indicates the amount of items. In a histogram, the width varies based on the class intervals. The same sample can be displayed with four wide bars with broad class intervals or with eight smaller bars reflecting small class intervals. Therefore, the amount of items in one bar is represented by its area and not by its height. To indicate the continuity between the bars, they are displayed touching each other. Note that a histogram will always represent one variable.

Research topics: Software & Technology